Science Fiction Pulps and Magazines
containing Jules Verne stories

Amazing Stories Pulp Magazine

Header from top of index page for quite a few issues:

Vol. 1, No. 1, April 1926 
Verne Story: Off on a Comet, or Hector Servadac, Pt 1 of 2, Page ?
Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1926 
Verne Story: Off on a Comet, or Hector Servadac, Pt 2 of 2, Page ?
          AND  A Trip to the Center of the Earth, Pt 1 of 3, Page ?
Vol. 1, No. 3, June 1926 
Verne Story: A Trip to the Center of the Earth, Pt 2 of 3, Page 196-231
Vol. 1, No. 4, July 1926 
Verne Story: A Trip to the Center of the Earth, Pt 3 of 3, Page 360-375 + 384
AND Edgar Allen Poe: The Sphinx, Page 357-359
AND H G Wells: The Man Who Could Work Miracles
 
N/A Vol. 1, No. 5, Aug. 1926 
Verne Story: Dr Ox's Experiment, Complete in one part, Page ?
Vol. 1, No. 6, Sept. 1926 
Verne Story: Purchase of the North Pole, Pt 1 of 2, Page ?
Vol. 1, No. 7, Oct. 1926 
Verne Story: Purchase of the North Pole, Pt 2 of 2, Page ?
Vol. 1, No. 8, Nov. 1926 
Verne Story: Drama in the Air (A), Complete in one part, Page ?
Vol. 2, No. 9, Dec. 1926 
Verne Story: Robur the Conqueror, or the Clipper of the Air, Pt 1 of 2, Page ?
(see Note in next description)
Vol. 2, No. 10, January 1928 
Verne Story: Robur the Conqueror, or the Clipper of the Air, Pt 2 of 2, Page 972
NOTE: The story in the magazine index, is subtitled Clipper of the Air, but when you go to the page where the story starts, it is subtitled Clipper of the Clouds.
N/A Vol. 2, No. 11, February 1928 
Verne Story: Master of the World, Pt 1 of 2, Page ?
Vol. 2, No. 12, March 1928 
Verne Story: Master of the World, Pt 2 of 2, Page ?
Vol. 4, No. 2, May 1929 
Verne Story: The English at the North Pole, Pt 1 of 2, Page 104
Vol. 4, No. 3, June 1929 
Verne Story: The English at the North Pole, Pt 2 of 2, Page ?
            AND The Desert of Ice, Pt 1 of 2
Vol. 4, No. 4, July 1929 
Verne Story: The Desert of Ice, Pt 2 of 2, Page 334
Vol. 8, No. 8, July 1933 
Verne Story: The Watch's Soul (Master Zacharius)
Complete in 1 part, Page 111
This issue contains a letter from Emil Pataja, Milltown, Mont. that suggests:
"... I noticed in a late issue of Amazing Stories, a Mr. Haggard suggests that you enlarge the Jules Verne tomb portrait and put in on a cover. I should like to add my pleas to this suggestion. It would make an admirable cover picture, as well as intimating to prospective readers that Amazing Stories is more than just a cheap pulp magazine. I'm sure that most of your readers will agree with this ..." 
The Editors replied: 
 "... Your suggestion about the Jules Verne portrait as a subject for the cover is a good one; we think it might be very interesting to use it and we will give the matter due consideration. ..." 
On Vol. 9, No. 1, they used this suggestion!
Amazing Stories Quarterly, Winter 1933 (January 1934) 
Verne Story: Winter Amid the Ice (A), or the Cruise of the Jeune-Hardie
Complete in one part, Page ?
Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1934 
Verne Story: Measuring a Meridian, Pt 1 of 4, Page 107 

This is an important issue because the cover design is that of Jules Verne's tomb in Amiens, France.
The description for the cover in the magazine reads:
"OUR COVER represents Jules Verne's monument in Nantes, France. He was one of the founders of the school of Science Fiction, which in late years has been acquiring a place in our literature - Drawn by Morey." 
It is strange that they make the mistake of identifying the location as Nantes, when in early issues, the image of the tomb appears at the top of every index page with the description:
"Jules Verne's tombstone at Amiens portraying his immortality." 

At the end of part one of this issues story, the following description of Jules Verne is given:
"The author of 'Measuring a Meridian' won an enduring fame for his stories devoted to science fiction. He was among the first writers in this field, and gave it a dignity by the length of his narrations as well as by their scientific basis. He was born February 8, 1828, in the city of Nantes, where his memory is preserved as one of the glories of the quiet little Breton City. He went to Paris to study law, but his genius for literature appeared in the writing of librettos for two operas when he was about twenty years old, and a couple of years later he collaborated with the younger Dumas on a comedy in verse. He wrote some stories of travelling adventure and these started him on his career. He is considered a pioneer in fiction travel stories. His science fiction story 'Five Weeks in a Balloon' is considered his first success in this type of romance. It appeared in 1862. He made his home in Amiens, where he died on March 24, 1905. The love motif was kept under successfully in his works. It may be noted that our readers sometimes made their protest against this topic appearing in our stories. 
He was a Member of the Legion of Honor, and several of his works were crowned by the French Academy. It is interesting to realize that while he was writing, the greatest developments in science and engineering were at their heights. 
His monument, emblem of his immortality, is depicted on our cover."

Vol. 9, No. 2, June 1934 
Verne Story: Measuring a Meridian, Pt 2 of 3, Page 103 
(actually part 2 of 4)
Vol. 9, No. 3, July 1934 
Verne Story: Measuring a Meridian, Pt 3 of 3, Page 59 
(actually part 3 of 4) 

also, on page 142, a letter from a Raymond A Palmer, 
Chairman of the Jules Verne Prize Club (?)

Vol. 9, No. 4, August 1934 
Verne Story: Measuring a Meridian, Pt 4 of 3(!!) - Conclusion, Page 42
Saturn, The Magazine of Science Fiction - Vol 1, No. ?, 1958
Verne Story: Eternal Adam
An external Link to More information on Amazing Stories and its History. 
and  more specific Verne Amazing stories link,

Jules Verne, his books, and Amazing Stories magazine appearances


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